install
   
icon

Southern Pacific P-8 Pacific Class Locomotive 2472. Owned by the Golden Gate Railroad Museum this 4-6-2 makes many excursions a year including this one during the labor day weekend.  Sister Locomotive to the P-8 2467 at the CSRM and the P-10 Class 2479 at the Santa Clara County Fairgrounds.

+ C. P. R .R. Locomotive 116 “White Eagle” 4-4-0 Danforth & Cook 15x22, 1860’s. Danforth-Cooke located in Paterson, New Jersey, manufactured steam railroad locomotives from 1852 until it was merged with seven other manufacturers to form American Locomotive Company (ALCO) in 1901. ALCO continued building new locomotives at the Cooke plant until 1926, producing nearly 3000 locomotives.

C. P. R .R. Locomotive 116 “White Eagle” 4-4-0 Danforth & Cook 15x22, 1860’s. Danforth-Cooke located in Paterson, New Jersey, manufactured steam railroad locomotives from 1852 until it was merged with seven other manufacturers to form American Locomotive Company (ALCO) in 1901. ALCO continued building new locomotives at the Cooke plant until 1926, producing nearly 3000 locomotives.

Nevada County Narrow Gauge #5, a 2-6-0 Mogul type. Built by Baldwin Locomotive works in 1875 for the Carson & Tahoe Lumber and Flume company, it was bought by the NCNG in 1899, and served until the beginning of 1941, when it was sold to Frank Lloyd Productions.

While there it served in many Television shows and Movies. It had a rough life while being a star, the tubes failed in the original boiler, and a “movie” rush job was done to replace it. As can be seen in the fuzzy photo the solution of the studio was to cut off the fire box, and weld in a cylindrical pressure vessel to act as a boiler. The saving grace is that the rest of the locomotive is original to the NCNG railroad.

Also pictured is the Stephenson valve gear and center “blind” wheel on the locomotive. The blind wheel was put in place so the locomotive could make the smaller radii curves common on narrow gauge railroads. Plans are being set in place to restore this locomotive with the boiler of her sister engine “The Glenbrook” of the Nevada State Railroad Museum.  

+ Central Pacific’s Grey Eagle, No. 118. A 4-4-0 American type. Built in 1868 by Danforth and Cooke, this locomotive was one of four locomotives owned by CP known to receive a duplex Worthington steam fire pump.Quite a bit of History on this locomotive.

During the summer of 1870, the Central Pacific (after a disastrous snow-shed fire during its first full year of operation) established three fire trains.  These trains were set up and deployed at Blue Canyon, Summit, and Truckee.  A fourth fire train was set up and deployed at Cisco after disastrous fires near Summit during September 1892.  According to John Signor’s book, Donner Pass - Southern Pacific’s Sierra Crossing, the first engines, so assigned, were the Governor Stanford, Grey Eagle, Unicorn and Merced.  Larger locomotives, in the form of 4-6-0’s, began to be assigned to fire train service around 1890.
Later in it’s life it was leased for freight hauling on the Virginia and Truckee lines, and served until it was scrapped 

Central Pacific’s Grey Eagle, No. 118. A 4-4-0 American type. Built in 1868 by Danforth and Cooke, this locomotive was one of four locomotives owned by CP known to receive a duplex Worthington steam fire pump.Quite a bit of History on this locomotive.

During the summer of 1870, the Central Pacific (after a disastrous snow-shed fire during its first full year of operation) established three fire trains.  These trains were set up and deployed at Blue Canyon, Summit, and Truckee.  A fourth fire train was set up and deployed at Cisco after disastrous fires near Summit during September 1892.  According to John Signor’s book, Donner Pass - Southern Pacific’s Sierra Crossing, the first engines, so assigned, were the Governor Stanford, Grey Eagle, Unicorn and Merced.  Larger locomotives, in the form of 4-6-0’s, began to be assigned to fire train service around 1890.

Later in it’s life it was leased for freight hauling on the Virginia and Truckee lines, and served until it was scrapped 

+ Typical freight locomotive of the Central Pacific Railroad. It had six drive wheels and could haul eighteen light freight cars. This is a short time after CP stopped naming its locomotives. 

Typical freight locomotive of the Central Pacific Railroad. It had six drive wheels and could haul eighteen light freight cars. This is a short time after CP stopped naming its locomotives. 

Return to the Folsom Valley Railroad!

This past week I went up to visit Terry from the Folsom Valley Line. This time he is running the Atlantic #3001 around the line. He is having some problems with Cricket #1’s tender so he is using this this locomotive. As you can see in comparison to last years post about him >Here< the Atlantic is a little worse for wear, but has much more power than her smaller sister on the line.

+ Central Pacific locomotive &#8220;Conness&#8221; on the turntable at Newcastle during construction of trestle, 1864

Central Pacific locomotive “Conness” on the turntable at Newcastle during construction of trestle, 1864

+ Conness Number Six engine with fuel box, standing on a trestle, Central Pacific Railroad, March, 1865- description from USC archiver

Conness Number Six engine with fuel box, standing on a trestle, Central Pacific Railroad, March, 1865- description from USC archiver

A Class S-10 oil burner, #1298 weighs 154,600 lbs and has 51” drivers and 19” x 26” cylinders. Operating at a boiler pressure of 190 psi, it delivered 29,720 lbs tractive effort. The tender was sold around 1987 to Rick Hamman as a spare for SP C-8 #2706, a Consolidation type (2-8-0) now owned by John Manly. As a consequence, #1298 stands somewhat bereft bedecked in rather garish colours behind a low wooden paling fence. It is apparently only one of two 0-6-0s to have the extra window in the cab

+ Southern Pacific 4-4-2 locomotive #3001 on Train #54, the pre-streamlined &#8220;San Joaquin Daylight,&#8221; is stopped and taking on water in this early 1930&#8217;s view at Modesto, California. Photographer: Ted Hopping

Southern Pacific 4-4-2 locomotive #3001 on Train #54, the pre-streamlined “San Joaquin Daylight,” is stopped and taking on water in this early 1930’s view at Modesto, California.

Photographer: Ted Hopping